so to speak spring 2016 issue

art + writing by: Chelsea Dingman / Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello / Robert Mertens / Milana Braslavsky / Andrea Donnelly / Jane Hugentober / Courtney Kessel /Alice Elizabeth Rogoff / Alyssa Quinn / Emily Van Duyne / Hillary Katz / Caroline Chavatel / Audrey Carroll / Rochelle Hurt / Jennifer Molnar / Erin Bertram / Corinne Schneider / Joyce Wilson Young / Barbara Stowe / Siân Griffiths / Jody Keisner / Laurette Folk / Read More >

Art

Artist Feature: Milana Braslavsky

Artist Feature: Milana Braslavsky

Milana Braslavsky

I work with domestic settings and distorted figuration, and the characters in my photographs transform themselves using basic materials including purses, pillows and their own hair. I use commonplace objects in combination with the human figure, or substitute objects for the figure to convey feelings of loneliness and comfort, as well as the need for physical and mental protection. The objects used in the photographs are …

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Fiction

Novelty Fades

Laurette Folk

She kept her head down, noting pieces of chrome, the crunch of sandal on pebbles on asphalt, the sound of whirring cars, a dead hawk with its pure white breast ripped apart and wings frayed every which way.

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Nonfiction

The Great Depression

Joyce Wilson Young

Perhaps because of the housing boom and bust of the early 21st century, American society is now more aware of the “near poor” or people who are just getting by. But when I was a teenager, normal-looking actually meant “just like everyone else.” No one knew I was hungry and poor.

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Poetry

blog

Speaking With Jessica Kallista: Artist & Gallery Owner

Speaking With Jessica Kallista: Artist & Gallery Owner

Holly Mason

While not every show will be for or about women or “women’s issues” or for or about diversity and diverse expression, Olly Olly shows are more likely than most in Northern Virginia to include art that represents varied perspectives, a wide variety of cultures, a wide variety of mediums, and a multiplicity of backgrounds and experiences. We think that this diversity results in better shows, in better conversations, and ultimately in the creation of a better art scene and a better community.

My work is often concerned with the everyday, calling to mind the familiar artifacts and ephemera of the mundane and reimagining and transforming them into fantastical dreamlike elements of magical worlds that are just below, above, or somehow beyond our reach. I’m continuously building an ongoing narrative exploring the concept of being a stranger in a strange land. I put myself or a persona or avatar of myself into a variety of situations and environments in order to play with or question a variety of assumptions about embodiment, decolonization, race, sexuality, gender, identity, space, and place.

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Speaking With DC Artist Jane Claire Remick

Speaking With DC Artist Jane Claire Remick

Holly Mason

JCR: It’s really important for me to work not just with Feminist ideas, but within the structure of the arts community and art ecology. In DC I’m super lucky to be able to work almost exclusively with other people who also identify as women, non-binary, and queer people. I’m very very lucky I think. It’s not “cool” in this century to be militant, but I’m pretty militant—if I know a gallery is showing 80% cis male white men, I don’t want to go there, I don’t want to work with them. I’m trying to figure out professionally when or if it’s worth it to make those compromises.

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"Catechism: A Love Story"

“Catechism: A Love Story”

Holly Mason

In this interview, Julie Marie Wade speaks with us about writing Catechism: A Love Story, and Kristina Marie Darling discusses the book’s design and layout decisions.

Wade: My guiding question for the project was: What happens after you reach adulthood? What next? Of course I was only seeking to answer this question in light of my own experience, but it seemed an important one to probe given how much emphasis had been placed in my youth on becoming the “right” kind of adult—successful, accomplished, and desirable to the right kind of men. My parents had wished for me a life of greater certainties, fiscal and otherwise, than they imagined were possible with a vocation in the Humanities and literary arts. They had always wanted me to be a medical doctor of some kind, but I had chosen to go a different way. The real deal-breaker, from their perspective, though, was that I had also chosen to give up the prospect of a heterosexual life once I fell indisputably in love with Angie Griffin during that first year of graduate school.

Darling: I try to design books that are beautiful as objects in themselves, enacting and communicating the kind of beauty found in the work. There’s a reason Julie’s work has gotten so much well-deserved recognition. She’s a gifted prose stylist who also addresses ambitious and compelling philosophical questions in her work.

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news

2015-16 Contest Issue

2015-16 Contest Issue

So to Speak Editors

At this year’s AWP conference, So to Speak proudly introduced the newest supplement to our publishing formats, the Contest Issue. Get a look at and support fantastic writing through purchasing a copy.

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