so to speak spring 2016 issue

art + writing by: Chelsea Dingman / Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello / Robert Mertens / Milana Braslavsky / Andrea Donnelly / Jane Hugentober / Courtney Kessel /Alice Elizabeth Rogoff / Alyssa Quinn / Emily Van Duyne / Hillary Katz / Caroline Chavatel / Audrey Carroll / Rochelle Hurt / Jennifer Molnar / Erin Bertram / Corinne Schneider / Joyce Wilson Young / Barbara Stowe / Siân Griffiths / Jody Keisner / Laurette Folk / Read More >

Art

Artist Feature: Jane Hugentober

Artist Feature: Jane Hugentober

Jane Hugentober

Jane Hugentober is an American artist. Born in Indiana, Jane lived in New York City and currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Jane graduated from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana and studied Fine Arts Painting at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Jane received her Master of Fine Arts, in Painting and Drawing, at University of California, Los Angeles, June …

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Fiction

Nonfiction

Nakedness

Siân Griffiths

My body is a private and practical thing—something yielded to the production of children and the scrubbing of a bathtub, but not something I would find either pleasure or pride in offering to the public. And yet, here I am, sitting in front of a computer, offering its naked portrait to the public gaze because, as a writer, my job is to be publicly naked.

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Poetry

blog

Domestic Territories

Domestic Territories

Holly Mason

Washington DC area artists were invited to consider how they negotiate the use of household space with their children. The work in the show investigates physical and emotional spaces that are separate, shared or disputed. By representing the constant evolution of personal boundaries in specific parent/child relationships, the exhibit highlights topics that are publicly debated but only privately encountered.

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Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here DC 2016

Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here DC 2016

Holly Mason

Al-Mutanabbi Street is Baghdad’s bookselling street, a place where, for hundreds of years, people could gather to read, find books in translation, swap subversive ideas, argue unpopular positions. In 2007, the street was destroyed in a car bomb; though no one took responsibility, it felt like a direct attack upon this freedom of thought, this essential humanism.

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