so to speak fall 2016 issue

art + writing by: Sukenya Best / Sarah Bates / Dorinda Wegener / Michelle Lewis / Monica Rico / Kathryn Merwin / Allison Thorpe / Sarah Escue / Marissa Stephens / Anne Champion / Nidhi Singh / Kate Blackwell / Annalise Mabe / Judy T. Oldfield / Raluca Ioanid / M.A. Jay / Kristina Marie Darling / Ellie Rogers / Judith H. Montgomery / Read More >

Art

Fiction

The Healing

Nidhi Singh

When the half-moon, past a half night bent its light on the red-brown building,the misery, it quickened, the despair, it doubled, grim thoughts like fiends fourscore, the spirit they pummeled.

The Bonners, they were at it again; rusty springs on their bed creaking as the walls shook with their heaving and cursing and panting. They’d cast their blind boy outside the shabby one-room apartment; he played …

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Nonfiction

Essays on Production

Kristina Marie Darling

I.

That winter, I took up writing in an attempt to forget the countryside.  My first play, carefully parsed out into eight acts, took place in a forest glittering with fresh sleet.  The foliage dead beneath its luminous exterior.  Faint music, then a long silence. Ophelia appears beneath a broken branch, seated on a tree halved by the storm.  Her dress is ruined.  Still, she looks …

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Poetry

Two Poems by Dorinda Wegener

Dorinda Wegener

If Your Family Owned a Mausoleum, then This Poem Would Make More Sense

 

Your sisters have found corpses: beautiful
one in the bath, the other hell
bent on their driving wheel, you say
your corpse has not yet been
behind cabinet door, scythed between
the smooth S-folds of faucet pipes under
sink nor face down, undercurrent, bumping bloated
limbs underbrush in bog water.

Your body has been undertaking the weight
of preposition and place, you …

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blog

Hip Hop and Prisoner Resistance

Hip Hop and Prisoner Resistance

Lissa Skitolsky

Hip Hop and Prisoner Resistance: Essay by Lissa Skitolsky

Most academic and popular discussions about resistance to structural oppression take a stand on the morality of violent vs. nonviolent resistance to racist, heterosexist, and classist oppression.   However recently scholars have identified alternative paths to resistance such as the politics of mourning in public spaces.[1] My experiences teaching philosophy in a women’s state prison have also revealed …

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Speaking With Jessica Kallista: Artist & Gallery Owner

Speaking With Jessica Kallista: Artist & Gallery Owner

Holly Mason

While not every show will be for or about women or “women’s issues” or for or about diversity and diverse expression, Olly Olly shows are more likely than most in Northern Virginia to include art that represents varied perspectives, a wide variety of cultures, a wide variety of mediums, and a multiplicity of backgrounds and experiences. We think that this diversity results in better shows, in better conversations, and ultimately in the creation of a better art scene and a better community.

My work is often concerned with the everyday, calling to mind the familiar artifacts and ephemera of the mundane and reimagining and transforming them into fantastical dreamlike elements of magical worlds that are just below, above, or somehow beyond our reach. I’m continuously building an ongoing narrative exploring the concept of being a stranger in a strange land. I put myself or a persona or avatar of myself into a variety of situations and environments in order to play with or question a variety of assumptions about embodiment, decolonization, race, sexuality, gender, identity, space, and place.

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Speaking With DC Artist Jane Claire Remick

Speaking With DC Artist Jane Claire Remick

Holly Mason

JCR: It’s really important for me to work not just with Feminist ideas, but within the structure of the arts community and art ecology. In DC I’m super lucky to be able to work almost exclusively with other people who also identify as women, non-binary, and queer people. I’m very very lucky I think. It’s not “cool” in this century to be militant, but I’m pretty militant—if I know a gallery is showing 80% cis male white men, I don’t want to go there, I don’t want to work with them. I’m trying to figure out professionally when or if it’s worth it to make those compromises.

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"Catechism: A Love Story"

“Catechism: A Love Story”

Holly Mason

In this interview, Julie Marie Wade speaks with us about writing Catechism: A Love Story, and Kristina Marie Darling discusses the book’s design and layout decisions.

Wade: My guiding question for the project was: What happens after you reach adulthood? What next? Of course I was only seeking to answer this question in light of my own experience, but it seemed an important one to probe given how much emphasis had been placed in my youth on becoming the “right” kind of adult—successful, accomplished, and desirable to the right kind of men. My parents had wished for me a life of greater certainties, fiscal and otherwise, than they imagined were possible with a vocation in the Humanities and literary arts. They had always wanted me to be a medical doctor of some kind, but I had chosen to go a different way. The real deal-breaker, from their perspective, though, was that I had also chosen to give up the prospect of a heterosexual life once I fell indisputably in love with Angie Griffin during that first year of graduate school.

Darling: I try to design books that are beautiful as objects in themselves, enacting and communicating the kind of beauty found in the work. There’s a reason Julie’s work has gotten so much well-deserved recognition. She’s a gifted prose stylist who also addresses ambitious and compelling philosophical questions in her work.

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