Spring 2015 Poetry Contest

September 18, 2014 by So to Speak · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Announcements, Contests, Poetry 

“We are over the moon with joy to announce Rebecca Hoogs as the contest judge of this spring’s poetry contest! Rebecca has published books of poetry on subjects ranging from language play and myth revision, to the self-portrait and personal understanding  Such books include Grenade (2005) and Self Storage(2013). She has also closely examined the role of the love poem in Jeremy Richards’ “How to Write Love Poems.”” — A.K. Padovich, StS’s Poetry Editor

Rebecca Hoogs is the author of a chapbook, Grenade (2005), and her poems have appeared in PoetryAGNICrazyhorse,ZyzzyvaThe Journal, Poetry Northwest,The Florida Review, and others. She is the recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony (2004) and Artist Trust of Washington State (2005). She is the Director of Education Programs and the curator and host of the Poetry Series for Seattle Arts & Lectures and has taught poetry in Rome for The University of Washington. Read Rebecca’s work here.

We are looking for poetry that formalistically, stylistically, and linguistically engages with the feminist world in some way. Please send us up to 5 poems (not to exceed 10 pages) and a cover letter, through our Submission Manager. The reading fee is $15 and can be paid through our Submission Manager.

All entrants will receive a free copy of our Spring 2015 issue.

Deadline: October 15, 2014

 

 

Fall for the Book 2014!

September 12, 2014 by So to Speak · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Announcements, News, Post by: Paula B, Uncategorized 

The sixteenth annual Fall for the Book festival is taking over George Mason University’s Fairfax, Virginia, campus and spreading out onto about two dozen other venues in Virginia, Maryland, and DC, Sept 11 – 18. Check out the following links for a sampling of a promising roster for the reader-writer-human in you.

 

Novelist and Essayist Roxane Gay @ Grand Tier III, Center for the Arts, George Mason University

Saturday, Sept. 13, 4:00 p.m.

Roxane Gay

 

 

An Untamed State. Bad Feminist. Enough said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grain Press Feminist Poetry Reading and Book Release Reception, The Arts Plaza Tent near the Center for the Arts at George Mason University

Saturday, Sept. 13, 4:00 p.m.

A reading and reception to honor Anne Lesley Selcer, whose collection from A Book of Poems on Beauty won Gazing Grain’s 2014 poetry chapbook contest, selected by judge Dawn Lundy Martin. This event celebrates inclusive feminist poetry and promotes socially conscious work in today’s literary community.

 

 

Everyone Is Gay Founders Dannielle Owens-Reid and Kristin Russo@ Research Hall, Room 163, George Mason University

Tuesday, Sept. 16, 3:00 p.m.

Owens-Reid and Russo

 

 

Outreach and empowerment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memoirist Dani Shapiro @ Grand Tier III, Center for the Arts, George Mason University

Tuesday, Sept 16, 6:00 p.m.

Dani Shapiro

 

On writing. On life. Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sociologist Earl Smith @ Sandy Spring Bank Tent, Johnson Center Plaza, George Mason University

Wednesday, Sept. 17, 1:30 p.m.

Earl Smith


 

Not a game: Race, Sport, and the American Dream

 

 

 

 

 

Historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz @ Sandy Spring Bank Tent, Johnson Center Plaza, George Mason University

Thursday, Sept. 18, 12:00 pm

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

 

On myths and truths: An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communications Scholar Sheena Howard @ Sandy Spring Bank Tent, Johnson Center Plaza, George Mason University

Thursday, Sept. 18, 1:30 p.m.

Sheena Howard

 

Infiltrating Comic-Con: Black Comics: Politics and Race of Representation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women and Gender Studies Scholar Wendy S. Hesford @ The HUB, Front Ballroom, George Mason University

Thursday, Sept. 18, 3:00 p.m.

Wendy S. Hesford

 

Spectacular Rhetorics: Human Rights Visions, Recognitions, Feminisms

 

 

 

 

A Welcome Note from StS’s Editor-in-Chief

By Jessie Szalay

Like many people who love school (or have residual nightmares of it), for me, January 1st has never felt like the start of a new year. Rather it’s September, the time of backpacks and book buying, that signals a fresh start. Whether I’m a student, a teacher, or working in a non-academic job, the new school year signals a time for reflection. How do I want to be this year?

Now, as I begin my first autumn as Editor-in-Chief of So to Speak, I wonder, too: what kind of feminist do I want to be? Initially, answers are easy. I want to be a strong feminist. I want to treat others—women who are and are not self-identifying feminists, men, myself—equally and with respect. I want to challenge the patriarchy and stand up for equality. I want to spread the message of feminism with both gentleness and strength, through words, actions, and my own thoughts. I believe that feminism, though often made up of individual choices, is also a communal paradigm, movement, and experience. As with empathy, generosity, and random acts of loving kindness, individual feminism—my feminism, your feminism—increases through being a shared experience. It can inspire others, make them think. That is what I want to do: I want to be a “good, strong feminist,” to inspire others to consider or adopt or increase their own feminist lives. I want So to Speak to do that.

But here’s the reality: all through high school, Septembers passed and I never stopped procrastinating on my Spanish homework. New Januaries turn to Februaries and I never get around to eating more kale. And I know that, most likely, October of this year will enter with its orange leaves and swollen pumpkins and I will still be struggling to be the kind of feminist that I want to be.

I’ve identified as a feminist for going on fifteen years, since high school. I can speak of Helene Cixous and Simone deBeauvoir; I support pro-choice causes; I feel comfortable with the notion that one can be feminist and be a stay-at-home mom, and also that one can be a feminist and burn her bra. The concept of what feminism is, and how open it can be, is not especially troubling to me. What is troubling is doing it: turning beliefs and intellectual knowledge into action and attitude.

I am a feminist, but the other day I still thought nastily that another woman shouldn’t wear her short-shorts because of her body type. I routinely make stereotypical assumptions about what men want women to be—agreeable, needless, pretty objects—which are disrespectful and condescending toward all genders. I catch myself thinking that my female gym instructor is bossy and annoying, while accepting a similarly tough male instructor as motivational. But I want to be better. I want to not have these thoughts, and the first step to not having them is acknowledging that I do.

My point is that being a feminist is a journey. It’s filled with obstacles and struggles. Feminism as a movement struggles, and individual feminists struggle within their own minds. We are all on a journey to be better feminists and better people. As a new (school) year starts, I realize that that’s what I really want to be: someone who takes steps on her journey.

That’s also what I want So to Speak to do. Stories of empowerment and success are always welcome, but so are stories of struggle. I invite you, readers and writers, to share with us your stories of setbacks in your feminist lives. Perhaps you’ve taken steps to overcome your problems. Perhaps you’re just acknowledging them for the first time and beginning your walk toward being the type of feminist, the type of person, that you want to be.

So to Speak is a feminist journal, which to me means that at its core it is a human journal. It is a place that celebrates humanity in its various forms—the beautiful and good, the ugly and difficult. I look forward to hearing your stories and engaging with your art, however it explores the complexities of life, and wherever you are on your own journey.

Our reading period is currently in full swing. Click here for submission guidelines for our blog, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry categories. And don’t forget to enter our Spring 2015 Nonfiction Contest!

 

Fall Submission Period Starts Today!

August 20, 2014 by So to Speak · 1 Comment
Filed under: Announcements, Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Uncategorized 

Listen up, y’all!

As of today, August 20th, and until October 25th, we’ll be accepting submissions for our print spring issue. Look into your feminist archives for your best work of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, or visual art, put it through a last round of tough love, and submit!

We know you know this but let us show you our love with a friendly reminder that we recommend  reading past issues for a feel of what makes our feminist hearts swell and minds soar. If you simply cannot endure waiting for your subscription to kick in, may I recommend our fourth annual summer issue, gratis and online for your reading pleasure.

Most important, take a moment to look over our Submit page where you’ll find guidelines for all genres, including the So to Speak blog.

Now begins the waiting game! Happy submission season!

StS Editors

2014-2015

 

 

 

4th Annual Summer Issue Is Here!

Cover Art: 2014 Summer Issue

Fresh from the Issuu presses: the 2014 fourth annual summer online issue is here!

The issue includes all of the genres you’ve come to expect from So to Speak: extraordinary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. The editorial staff is happy to introduce you to the work of these feminist writers and artists and invites you to join the conversation. Read the new issue HERE or click on the cover art to the left. Then be sure to check back (great time to subscribe to the blog!) later this summer for posts by our contributing writers and artists, as well as guest writers, on craft and feminism. When you find a blog that resonates with you, engage with the writer via the message board, share the piece widely, and come back for more!

Our blog aims to offer a platform for continuous dialogue on the challenges and successes of our feminisms,  which can be found everywhere. So enjoy reading our latest summer issue, sharing your fave finds, and writing your own contribution to the worldwide dialogue of feminism in action–check out submission guidelines for our journal and blog!

–StS Staff

Here are the writers and artists featured in the 4th annual online summer issue of So to Speak:

Visual Art

Alex Pohl

Fiction

Allison Amend

Sara Erdman

Nonfiction

Catherine Kasper

Eryn Lyndal Martin

Erika D. Price

Poetry

Jessica Rae Bergamino

Joanna Catonar

Sarah A. Chavez

H. V. Crammond

Donelle Dreese

Geanni Galeazzi

Jessica Glover

Jane Joritz-Nakagawa

Becca J. R. Lachman

Giki Marks

Freesia McKee

Laura Passin

Molly Prosser

Dean Shaban

Meredith Trede

Joy Von III

 

 

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