Month: April 2017

National Poetry Month

In honor of National Poetry Month, our staff put together a list of 12 stunning, mighty, & nourishing poems. Featuring poems by: Camille Rankine, Franny Choi, Meg Day, Christopher Soto (Loma), Zeina Hashem Beck, Natalie Diaz, Travis Lau, Saeed Jones, Aracelis Girmay, Oliver Baez Bendorf, Lisa Summe, Dana Levin

Review of J.K. Daniels’ Wedding Pulls

Daniels’ Wedding Pulls is a collection rooted first and foremost in place, that place being New Orleans. Daniels uses place not only to ground her readers, but to present them with culture rich in tradition. Beginning with the proem “On St. Charles Ave.” Daniel’s sets the reader up for what to expect throughout the book: highly sonic, highly image driven poetry that explores not only New Orleans, but the institution of marriage and the traditions (i.e. wedding pulls) that surround it in New Orleans.

Exits and Entrances: Meet the Editors

Part of the So to Speak mission is to recognize that no work is produced in a void apart from experience. That what we produce is inextricably connected to who we are and the lives we live. And, just as we want to recognize this in the work we publish, we want to recognize that the editorial process of selecting and presenting work is connected to the individuals that compose the So to Speak’s staff. We don’t want the name of our journal to obscure the fact that individual bodies and minds work behind the print. With this in mind, I set off to ask our outgoing editors a few things about their time at So to Speak and the incoming editors about their goals for strengthening the journal’s ability to serve in the coming year.

Lithium // Unobtainium

// Unobtainium Science fiction always begins after an unethical decision. For the greater good, greater bad, greater neutrality of some alien race who may or

Review of Lena Khalaf Tuffaha’s Water & Salt

Lena Khalaf Tuffaha’s Water & Salt is one of the most gorgeous renderings of the Levant I’ve ever read. Tuffaha, an Arab-American poet of Palestinian, Jordanian, and Syrian heritage, writes from a place of familial memory and nostalgia, a place of longing and loss, of displacement and deciphering home. Tuffaha’s poems are required reading material for any Arab-American literature list, and for all Americans whose knowledge of the Middle East ends at what the media reports.

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